Friday, February 28, 2014

Moving the Mountain

It is the end of an era – much was learned, much was lost.  The choice for change, for an end, for justice and for peace has already been made.  This choice was made by everyone; this “everyone” includes every person inside the 7 billion of humanity.  Movement is accomplished bit by bit – sudden movements are not possible.  Change is inevitable and guaranteed.  It feels slow.  You are moving more than a mountain.  You are altering an entire race.

This thing that is happening, this altering of life on earth, is occurring within the only “time frame” that it can. Depending on your location and perspective, you’ll consider this process to be too fast, too slow or appropriate.  Yet it is happening, and evidence of the change is everywhere.

To move something this large takes time and planning.  Imagine moving a 7 billion pound animal.  First you’d have to understand where it was going.  Then you’d make sure it would fit and create the appropriate home for it.  After that there may be some effort put into explaining to the animal where it was headed and why.  Each effort would bring it a little closer to being ready to go.

Once completed, the move itself, if it were to happen at the animals own pace and instigation, would have to happen relatively gradually so as not to disturb the life cycle too much.  The goal would be seamless rather than shocking, to maintain the health and well being of the animal.

Some parts of the creature would get there sooner than other parts. Some sections may require special assistance; an animal of this size quite possibly has never moved from where it began.  It has no innate facility to do so now.  Learning will be necessary so that cooperation and willingness can support the effort.

All of this, although happening at the same time, may appear unrelated and disconnected.  The sheer size of this animal means that parts of it are separated from other parts by great distances.  These parts may even reside in different time zones.  For something this large, movement is barely perceptible.  “Time”, awareness and comparison are the tools used to measure change.  Speed is relative and in this effort, a day, week or even a year may yield only slight differences.

What is important is the health and autonomy of the animal.  The desired effect, at the culmination of this effort, is for it to feel a sense of accomplishment and understanding for what it has done.

If, on the other hand, you were able to forcibly pick up this 7 billion pound animal and drop it into a new “home”, the effect would be one of confusion, trauma, stress and loss.  The suffering and pain that would result would cause irreparable damage to some parts and even possibly death. 

The goal here is to assist this animal in moving to a new place all on its own. Nothing moves without consent and understanding.  This is not an aggressive shove but a universal adjustment, orchestrated in beautiful synchronicity by every single cell of the animal.  Progress is nearly invisible unless you step back a very great distance.  Yet movement is felt everywhere, some of it painful, some of it joyful, all of it indicative of this massive shift that is happening.

We chose to move all 7 billion pounds by ourselves and we are doing so.  With each individual change we slightly alter our position.  One day we’ll look back and see just how far we’ve come.  As long as we stay the course, our arrival is assured. 

We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.

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