Saturday, February 8, 2014

US tests B61 Atomic Bomb - fire later that night at Los Alamos labs

US tests B61 Atomic Bomb - fire later that night at Los Alamos labs
Posted by D. at Removing the Shackles

About two hours after I published the Transpicuous News for Feb 6, I received an email from a reader in Los Alamos, Stating that on Feb 5th  "there was a fire Wednesday night at the site where they bury the lab's radio-active wastes (alarming enough in itself-but they own the town--which is full of cancer patients). "

I sent that information through a few channels that I have to check things and sure enough I last night I received verification of these events.

I am posting all the links below for the information that I have been looking into.
Fire prompts evacuation at WIPP
By Associated Press
Wednesday, February 5, 2014 at 5:21 pm (Updated: February 5, 9:26 pm)
CARLSBAD, N.M. (AP) — Emergency crews battled a fire Wednesday at the southeastern New Mexico site where the federal government seals away its low-grade nuclear waste, including plutonium-contaminated clothing and tools.
Six people were treated for smoke inhalation and released a short while later after a truck hauling salt caught fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad.
All employees were evacuated from the underground site after the fire broke out about 11 a.m. Wednesday, and none of the radioactive waste was affected, plant officials said.
Authorities said they weren't sure what caused the blaze.

The B61 nuclear bomb is one of the primary thermonuclear weapons in the U.S. Enduring Stockpile following the end of the Cold War. It is an intermediate yield strategic and tactical nuclear weapon featuring a two-stage radiation implosion design.[1]

The US has successfully tested an updated version of a B-61 atomic bomb in defiance of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, which calls for nuclear disarmament.

The National Nuclear Security Administration said in a statement that the test was conducted on Tuesday by the Los Alamos and Sandia national laboratories, National Journal reported.

The analysis "is a significant achievement and gives us confidence in our ability to move forward with our efforts to increase the safety and security of the bomb," Don Cook, NNSA deputy administrator for defense programs, said.

The test was meant to verify how a new model of the B-61 bomb would work under routine conditions or accident scenarios, according to the NNSA.

The analysis also included the targeting accuracy of the revamped model of the nuclear gravity bomb also called Mod-12.

Engineering work for Mod-12, which has been underway for two years, is aimed at keeping B-61 bombs ready for potential use and bolstering their security.

The initial test "provides data for analytical model correlation and validation, insight into component environments and evaluation of developmental hardware," the NNSA said.
"The mechanical environment test series will assist in qualifying the final B-61‐12 design against the full suite of environments."
AGB/AGB                                                               and

Jan. 15, 2014
The United States on Tuesday said it dropped a B-61 nuclear-bomb exterior in a test that rammed the unarmed weapon through the earth's surface.
Sandia National Laboratories said it saw no surprises in the outcome of exercise, which used a B-61 Mod 11 bomb lacking any atomic materials. The analysis at the Coyote Canyon Test Range was the New Mexico facility's first test in seven years to scrutinize how such a weapon -- rocket-propelled for the trial drop -- makes contact with the earth's surface, according to a press release.
Laboratory personnel outfitted the armament with thrusters to slam it into the ground, as well as measurement tools to gather data on its physical behavior. As part of the examination, workers chilled the weapon's inner and outer parts to a level significantly below 0 degrees Fahrenheit prior to its release.
Such "surveillance" assessments focus on how bomb parts act in a specific environment, and can involve a range of physical situations.
Initial findings from the latest test indicate that the weapon's performance was satisfactory in the least-accommodating environment in which it is still expected to be highly dependable, senior manager Patrick Sena said in provided comments.
"One important way to assure deterrence is to have a successful surveillance test that shows our systems work," he said.
 In investigating Sandia National Laboratories I came across this:
"Z Machine

Sandia is home to Earth’s most powerful pulsed-power facility and X-ray generator. The Z machine compresses energy in time and space to achieve extreme powers and intensities for research in high energy density science."

  From Wikipedia:
The Sandia National Laboratories, managed and operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation), are two major United States Department of Energy research and development national laboratories....

...Sandia National Laboratories' roots go back to World War II and the Manhattan Project.
...In the many months leading up to successful detonation of the first atomic bomb, the Trinity test, and delivery of the first airborne atomic weapon, Project Alberta, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Director of Los Alamos Laboratory, and his technical advisor, Hartly Rowe, began looking for a new site convenient to Los Alamos for the continuation of weapons development – especially its non-nuclear aspects. They felt a separate division would be best to perform these functions. Kirtland had fulfilled Los Alamos' transportation needs for both the Trinity and Alberta projects, thus, Oxnard Field was transferred from the jurisdiction of the Army Air Corps to the U.S. Army Service Forces Chief of Engineer District, and thereafter, assigned to the Manhattan Engineer District. In July 1945, the forerunner of Sandia Laboratory, known as "Z" Division, was established at Oxnard Field to handle future weapons development, testing, and bomb assembly for the Manhattan Engineer District. The District-directive calling for establishing a secure area and construction of "Z" Division facilities referred to this as "Sandia Base" — apparently the first official recognition of the "Sandia" name.

 .....On February 13, 2007, a New Mexico State Court found Sandia Corporation liable for $4.7 million in damages for the firing of a former network security analyst, Shawn Carpenter, who had reported to his supervisors that hundreds of military installations and defense contractors' networks were compromised and sensitive information was being stolen – including hundreds of sensitive Lockheed documents on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter project. When his supervisors told him to drop the investigation and do nothing with the information, he went to intelligence officials in the United States Army and later the Federal Bureau of Investigation to address the national security breaches. When Sandia managers discovered his actions months later, they revoked his security clearance and fired him.[2] 

Posted by D ... Breaking The Silence at 06:20

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